millernn2
journey-to-balance:

6 THINGS EVERY OPTIMIST BELIEVES ~
What if the solution to being happier and healthier depended on how much liquid you thought was in a glass?
If you approach reality with a glass-half-empty mentality, there may be a thing or two you can learn from those who see it from the other side. Optimism has been linked to better cholesterol, a better handle on stress and a stronger immune system.
So how can we start adopting a brighter mentality? There are certain beliefs people on the sunny side remind themselves of on a daily basis — and just knowing these facts enhances how they live their lives. Below, find six silver linings optimists know to be true.
Good things are going to happen.
Life is a series of ups and downs — and when they’re in a valley, optimists anticipate the peak that’s right around the corner. It’s that buoyant attitude that can better help you cultivate resilience, writes psychologist Sherrie Bourg Carter, Psy.D. “The truth is that disappointments and challenges are an inevitable part of life,” she explains in a Psychology Today blog. “So why not view them as opportunities to learn, grow and improve? If you do, you’re on the road to resilience and that’s exactly where you want to be during tough times.”
Gratitude makes you stronger.
Optimists aren’t just very aware of the positive aspects of their lives, they make sure to take stock of them. As a result, these simple acts of gratitude improve their mental well-being. Research has shown that expressing thanks can increase joy, result in better sleep and even improve heart health.
Tomorrow is a new day.
As Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote, “Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some blunders and absurdities no doubt crept in; forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day. You shall begin it serenely and with too high a spirit to be encumbered with your old nonsense.”
Optimists know that when things don’t go their way, they’ve just had a bad day — not a bad life — and a new one is coming tomorrow. Optimists know tomorrow is a fresh start, which can in turn help lessen the negative experience of that bad day. Not a bad way to end a bad day, after all.
Anyone has the power to make a difference.
Part of having a sunny disposition is choosing to see all the goodness that exists in the world. While some may feel this is a daft outlook, optimists may see their attitude as a way to make a difference. Research suggests this approach benefits them: A 2013 study found that realistic optimists were more likely to achieve more success and happiness due to their positive, yet grounded views.
Sleep is critical.
No one likes to be around someone who wakes up on the wrong side of the bed. In order to have a positive attitude rather than a grumpy one, optimists get their proper shut-eye. And this habit helps: Research suggests that getting enough sleep may be linked with positive personality traits, such as optimism and self-esteem.
Forgiveness is key to a happier life.
We all have our pitfalls — and optimists choose to see those as opportunities for second chances. As Contagious Optimism author David Mezzapelle explains, adopting a bright mentality allows you to let go of a grudge in order to live a long, joyful life.
"This is easier said than done but you need to forgive those that have affected your ability to find the silver linings," he told HuffPost. “I believe that the easiest way to forgive and move on is to reflect on the fact that the past is the past. Just look at it this way; the person that you are having a hard time forgiving probably wishes that he or she could erase the past as well.”
Written By: Lindsay Holmes, THE HUFFINGTON POST
Photo Credit: Maritza Alvarez, Creator, Our Journey to Balance
Providing Life Affirming Content to Balance the Mind, Body & Spirit ~

journey-to-balance:

6 THINGS EVERY OPTIMIST BELIEVES ~

What if the solution to being happier and healthier depended on how much liquid you thought was in a glass?

If you approach reality with a glass-half-empty mentality, there may be a thing or two you can learn from those who see it from the other side. Optimism has been linked to better cholesterol, a better handle on stress and a stronger immune system.

So how can we start adopting a brighter mentality? There are certain beliefs people on the sunny side remind themselves of on a daily basis — and just knowing these facts enhances how they live their lives. Below, find six silver linings optimists know to be true.

Good things are going to happen.

Life is a series of ups and downs — and when they’re in a valley, optimists anticipate the peak that’s right around the corner. It’s that buoyant attitude that can better help you cultivate resilience, writes psychologist Sherrie Bourg Carter, Psy.D. “The truth is that disappointments and challenges are an inevitable part of life,” she explains in a Psychology Today blog. “So why not view them as opportunities to learn, grow and improve? If you do, you’re on the road to resilience and that’s exactly where you want to be during tough times.”

Gratitude makes you stronger.

Optimists aren’t just very aware of the positive aspects of their lives, they make sure to take stock of them. As a result, these simple acts of gratitude improve their mental well-being. Research has shown that expressing thanks can increase joy, result in better sleep and even improve heart health.

Tomorrow is a new day.

As Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote, “Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some blunders and absurdities no doubt crept in; forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day. You shall begin it serenely and with too high a spirit to be encumbered with your old nonsense.”

Optimists know that when things don’t go their way, they’ve just had a bad day — not a bad life — and a new one is coming tomorrow. Optimists know tomorrow is a fresh start, which can in turn help lessen the negative experience of that bad day. Not a bad way to end a bad day, after all.

Anyone has the power to make a difference.

Part of having a sunny disposition is choosing to see all the goodness that exists in the world. While some may feel this is a daft outlook, optimists may see their attitude as a way to make a difference. Research suggests this approach benefits them: A 2013 study found that realistic optimists were more likely to achieve more success and happiness due to their positive, yet grounded views.

Sleep is critical.

No one likes to be around someone who wakes up on the wrong side of the bed. In order to have a positive attitude rather than a grumpy one, optimists get their proper shut-eye. And this habit helps: Research suggests that getting enough sleep may be linked with positive personality traits, such as optimism and self-esteem.

Forgiveness is key to a happier life.

We all have our pitfalls — and optimists choose to see those as opportunities for second chances. As Contagious Optimism author David Mezzapelle explains, adopting a bright mentality allows you to let go of a grudge in order to live a long, joyful life.

"This is easier said than done but you need to forgive those that have affected your ability to find the silver linings," he told HuffPost. “I believe that the easiest way to forgive and move on is to reflect on the fact that the past is the past. Just look at it this way; the person that you are having a hard time forgiving probably wishes that he or she could erase the past as well.”

Written By: Lindsay Holmes, THE HUFFINGTON POST

Photo Credit: Maritza Alvarez, Creator, Our Journey to Balance

Providing Life Affirming Content to Balance the Mind, Body & Spirit ~

fastcompany
fastcompany:

No more excuses: Stop procrastinating and get to work with these tips.
One of the biggest problems you need to solve if you work for yourself is how to make yourself do work.
The best entrepreneurs have figured it out and just pound out the work they need to do.
But many others put off their dream careers, or stay in jobs they don’t like, because they’re afraid to figure this out. Being in a job, or staying in college, means that you have someone else imposing work and deadlines on you, and you’ll get fired (or dropped from school) if you don’t do the work. So you put off doing the work until you can’t anymore because of the fear of being fired.
What does this say about us? It’s saying that we can’t trust ourselves enough to figure out how to motivate ourselves. I know, because I was in this boat for many years. It wasn’t until I started to learn to solve this problem that I found the courage to work for myself.
It’s solvable. It’s not easy, but it’s doable. And you can do it just as much as I can—I’m no superman, trust me. I feel lazy, I procrastinate, I fear failure, just like anyone else. But I’ve learned a few things that work for me.
What works for you will be different, but here are some ideas I use that might help:
Read More> 

fastcompany:

No more excuses: Stop procrastinating and get to work with these tips.

One of the biggest problems you need to solve if you work for yourself is how to make yourself do work.

The best entrepreneurs have figured it out and just pound out the work they need to do.

But many others put off their dream careers, or stay in jobs they don’t like, because they’re afraid to figure this out. Being in a job, or staying in college, means that you have someone else imposing work and deadlines on you, and you’ll get fired (or dropped from school) if you don’t do the work. So you put off doing the work until you can’t anymore because of the fear of being fired.

What does this say about us? It’s saying that we can’t trust ourselves enough to figure out how to motivate ourselves. I know, because I was in this boat for many years. It wasn’t until I started to learn to solve this problem that I found the courage to work for myself.

It’s solvable. It’s not easy, but it’s doable. And you can do it just as much as I can—I’m no superman, trust me. I feel lazy, I procrastinate, I fear failure, just like anyone else. But I’ve learned a few things that work for me.

What works for you will be different, but here are some ideas I use that might help:

Read More> 

fastcompany
fastcompany:

The bad news: Our brains are wired to be negative. The good news: Happiness doesn’t mean you have to be naive, just think realistically.
Wouldn’t it be awesome if we could hack into our own brains and rewire them to be happier?
Science has shown we actually can thanks to a phenomenon called experience-dependent neuroplasticity. “It’s a fancy term to say the brain learns from our experiences,” says Rick Hanson, neuropsychologist and author of the bookHardwiring Happiness. “As we understand better and better how this brain works, it gives us more power to change our mind for the better.”
Hanson assures he isn’t just talking new-age mumbo jumbo. “This is not just ‘smell the roses,’” he says. “I am talking about positive neuroplasticity. I am talking about learning. … The brain is changing based on what flows through it.”
Understanding how our brains function can help us better control them. Here are some key takeaways from Hanson on how our brains work when it comes to wiring for happiness:
Read More>

fastcompany:

The bad news: Our brains are wired to be negative. The good news: Happiness doesn’t mean you have to be naive, just think realistically.

Wouldn’t it be awesome if we could hack into our own brains and rewire them to be happier?

Science has shown we actually can thanks to a phenomenon called experience-dependent neuroplasticity. “It’s a fancy term to say the brain learns from our experiences,” says Rick Hanson, neuropsychologist and author of the bookHardwiring Happiness. “As we understand better and better how this brain works, it gives us more power to change our mind for the better.”

Hanson assures he isn’t just talking new-age mumbo jumbo. “This is not just ‘smell the roses,’” he says. “I am talking about positive neuroplasticity. I am talking about learning. … The brain is changing based on what flows through it.”

Understanding how our brains function can help us better control them. Here are some key takeaways from Hanson on how our brains work when it comes to wiring for happiness:

Read More>

thymoss

We begin to find and become ourselves when we notice how we are already found, already truly, entirely, wildly, messily, marvelously who we were born to be. The only problem is that there is also so much other stuff, typically fixations with how people perceive us, how to get more of the things that we think will make us happy, and with keeping our weight down. So the real issue is how do we gently stop being who we aren’t? How do we relieve ourselves of the false fronts of people-pleasing and affectation, the obsessive need for power and security, the backpack of old pain, and the psychic Spanx that keeps us smaller and contained?

Here’s how I became myself: mess, failure, mistakes, disappointments, and extensive reading; limbo, indecision, setbacks, addiction, public embarrassment, and endless conversations with my best women friends; the loss of people without whom I could not live, the loss of pets that left me reeling, dizzying betrayals but much greater loyalty, and overall, choosing as my motto William Blake’s line that we are here to learn to endure the beams of love.

fastcompany
fastcompany:

If your motto is no new friends, it’s time to challenge yourself and get out of your comfort zone. The payoff will be worth it.
We all seem to gravitate toward our comfort zones from time to time, and one of the easiest ways to stay there is to spend time with people who are just like us.
These people agree with us, think like us, and have a similar viewpoint on issues. But while this may seem to make our lives easier, there is also a downside.
Only spending time with people like us prevents us from growing, and even though we may be less comfortable hanging around people who are different from us, doing so also helps us to expand in crucial areas.Here are five benefits of spending time with people who are different from us:
Read More>

fastcompany:

If your motto is no new friends, it’s time to challenge yourself and get out of your comfort zone. The payoff will be worth it.

We all seem to gravitate toward our comfort zones from time to time, and one of the easiest ways to stay there is to spend time with people who are just like us.

These people agree with us, think like us, and have a similar viewpoint on issues. But while this may seem to make our lives easier, there is also a downside.

Only spending time with people like us prevents us from growing, and even though we may be less comfortable hanging around people who are different from us, doing so also helps us to expand in crucial areas.

Here are five benefits of spending time with people who are different from us:

Read More>